Misleading Facebook posts are misleading

I’m trying to follow a new personal rule about Facebook responses: if mine hit two paragraphs, consider a blog post. The potential elimination of overtime pay and a Facebooker’s promiscuous use of the term “misleading” lead me to this post.

legreeHere’s the news that prompted the Facebook post that I ultimately wanted to respond to.  To the left of this paragraph is a screenshot of the original Facebook post and the comment that prompted this response, exactly as the post and comment appeared. The screenshot is a little small and I don’t intend for it to appear misleading, so please click for a more easily read view.

Full disclosure: yes, that last bit was an outright lie.  I blanked out the name of the commenter (using the unofficial colors of Labor Day) and the name of the original poster, because I don’t want to draw undue attention to anyone’s friends, even if they are posting on a public forum. And I did do the hat.

But everything else is just as it appears in real life. Especially the mustache. I swear it on the Internet.

Continue reading

Satan, Senators, and State Parks

Summer is the time to get out and enjoy the state parks — particularly if you’re in Wisconsin, because there’s no telling how much longer some of them are going to be around.

The family at Copper Falls State Park in Northern Wisconsin. The state couldn't kill the park through mining permits, so it looks like it's trying through defunding.

Our family at Copper Falls State Park in Northern Wisconsin. The state couldn’t kill the park through mining permits, so it looks like it’s trying through defunding.

Sound exaggerated?  Consider that Alabama has reckoned on closing 15 of its state parks, leaving only seven for the public to enjoy. Given that Wisconsin will remove all tax support for the parks, it’s reasonable to assume that some, if not many, of our 50 or so* state parks won’t be open when the next legislatively manufactured budget “crisis” rolls around in two years.

It’s crucial to note that the seven parks that would survive Alabama’s short-sighted proposal are those that have “consistently made a profit” over a three-year period, according to the state parks director.

Continue reading